1 EAGLETON NOTES: A Dawn Journey

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Tuesday, 7 February 2017

A Dawn Journey

Last week Gaz and I went to Inverness on Monday morning and returned on Tuesday evening. On the outward journey across The Minch at dawn the weather was idyllic and I managed the following photos as we sailed into the mouth of Loch Broom towards Ullapool.







Then as we exited Strath Garve by road and  saw the lower slopes leading towards Ben Wyvis the mist and frost gradually got thicker and colder.




28 comments:

  1. What a lovely journey ... albeit into coldness. I loved the last pic, however. I suppose that's easy for me to say sitting here in shorts and teeshirt...

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    1. Well, Kate, it's a journey I hope that you will one day make although on a warmer day.

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  2. Great photos. It looks cold.

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  3. My goodness that looks cold. Good to see some trees too. I can almost imagine the Vikings turning up.

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    1. There's plenty of trees on the Mainland once one gets well away from the coast Cro.

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  4. This is not the first time that I am saying this in a comment on your blog, but it is true and bears repeating, I think: There is something magic and surreal about this stunningly beautiful landscape.

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    1. For me, Meike, the Scottish Highlands have an atmosphere that I've never experienced anywhere else.

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  5. A heavy mornings frost greets us quite often - thank you for sharing yours ;-)

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    1. Heron on Lewis frosts like that are rare but it's quite awesome seeing them on the Mainland

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  6. A magnificent sequence of photos, Graham.

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  7. What a gorgeous sunrise and a lovely series of landscapes as the dawn turns to morning.

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    1. Yes Liz it's not unusual here on the West Coast of Scotland but most of my photos are from the Island of the sunrise over the Mainland. This was a first for me.

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  8. Stunning photographs, both mysterious and ethereal. I've just ordered some scented candles from Ullapool from an enterprise that works with adults with special needs. Maybe you have seen it there near the harbour. One of the candles is described as Scottish Heather, I shall think of your photos when I am enjoying the fragrance.

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    1. Yes, Cath, the business is in the building that used to be the offices Caledonian MacBrayne the ferry company in Ullapool. I haven't been up into their workshop or showroom but I shall try and do that when I return from Glasgow next week.

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  9. I loved the second picture with those three bands of rolling morning cloud made rosy by the sunrise and the mainland far distant beneath like another world waiting to host The Further Adventures of Graham and Gaz...

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    1. You will always be the poet won't you YP. I'm glad that one of the pictures moved you thus.

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  10. When yond same star that’s westward from the pole
    Had made his course to illume that part of heaven
    Where now it burns...

    (Okay, that was Shakespeare, Hamlet to be exact, but I didn't want to be left out!)

    Lovely pics, GB!! I can smell that air... nothing else like it in the whole world.

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    1. Mrs S. Much as I love Shakespeare and Hamlet in particular I don't remember those lines. The air is beauteous beyond measure though and is delightful to the nostrils.

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  11. Lovely ! ...and we are really sweltering Downunder.

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    1. Helsie I do love the journey when it's like that (as it was again this week) but I've been on some less than pleasant journeys too. Scotland's gripped in a cold spell at the moment.

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  12. Love that last photo - it's just damp and a bit cloudy here!

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    1. Well I hope it's like the photos when you are here in the summer CJ.

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  13. Returning to these photos on my computer - I just remembered I'd only looked at them on my phone. Noticing the little houses beneath the mighty mountains now makes it all look even more impressive :) And the last two with the fog and frost look like they belong in some magic fantasy world...

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    1. Monica it is the dwarfing of human activity by the sheer size and space in The Highlands that makes them all the more impressive to the traveller looking at them from the sea.

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  14. A stunning sequence of photos. What an amazing landscape!!

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    1. Thank you Lynda. The landscape is a very different one from that of the coastal plains of Eastern Australia that's for sure.

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